theydigthecape

theydigthecape:

“We’re not bad people, we just come from a bad place.”

I love this film.  it’s horrible and gut wrenching and I always feel like I’m going to throw up by the time it’s over, but I have watched it more than once and I will watch it again.  the acting is unbelievable all round, even if I think some of the themes were badly approached by the writer and director.  there were some outs taken that I… disliked.  but on the whole?  Shame is the best film I’ve seen in, oh, probably a decade.

fair warning: unless you have the emotional composition of a rock, Shame will gut you.  so if that’s not what you’re looking for in a film, you might want to keep walking.

I love it when a film just gets into you, when it becomes part of your set of general references for how you think about the world. I saw it twice, so in some ways it’s not very surprising that I remember so much of the film so distinctly - but then, I have seen other movies multiple times recently and not had the same level of visceral recall as I do with this one.

I guess in a way I feel like I know these people - really know them, I mean. Which is interesting, because I don’t think the screenplay is phenomenal - I think it’s good, but not really doing anything that ground-breaking - and usually I really prefer movies with amazing screenplays. But what McQueen does with it, and what the actors do with their parts, completely put it on a different level. This was pretty easily my favorite film of last year (though Drive and Weekend were pretty fucking good, too), and Fassbender’s performance is probably one of the two best I’ve ever seen (the other being DDL in There Will Be Blood). I mean, it’s just unreal. I don’t know how it’s possible.

Have you seen Hunger? If not, I would definitely recommend it - it’s one of my top… four? five? of all time. (Shame would go on the list, for sure, but further down.) I’d hesitate to say that it’s less emotionally gripping or affecting than Shame, but it’s operating in a very different way - it is incredibly agonizing but not in a personal psychological way; it’s much more abstract. I think it’s a better film/work of art, but it doesn’t have a Brandon, that’s for sure.

The Man Without Qualities: OSLO, AUGUST 31st

Midway through Joachim Trier’s sophomore feature, Oslo, August 31st, its protagonist, a recovering addict, Anders (Anders Danielson Lie, who, miraculously, spends most of his time working not as an actor but a doctor), has an interview for an editorial assistant position at a high-brow literary magazine. When the interviewer asks Anders what he thinks of the magazine, Anders can’t help telling him what he really thinks: it’s mostly all right, he says, but some of the pieces are too fluffy, singling out the one on Mad Men and The Man Without Qualities for a particular beating. The editor doesn’t mind the criticism, but Anders botches the interview anyway. He has something of a self-destructive streak.

The film could easily have been titled The Man Without Qualities, for Anders is himself remarkably ephemeral: there is something slender about his character itself, not merely his body. It is as though an artist created him and didn’t color him properly, or maybe like he’s been erased, over time. The physicality of his body seems somehow paradoxical in this light: there is not enough of him to fill it. We imagine that if he turned away from us he would disappear entirely, and yet there he remains on the screen. This is not to suggest that his presently-felt sorrow and anguish are not felt potently in the film, or expertly conveyed by Lie, who embodies his character’s despair so acutely that it is sometimes painful to watch. But although Anders’ depression is forcefully present in the film, there is still an emptiness about him that is haunting. In a way the most distinct character in the film is not Anders but Oslo itself, which provides a reassuring concreteness that Anders himself lacks, and is beautiful and ordered in a way that does not invite, at least aesthetically, his degeneracy.

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fuckyeahfassbender

The scene where Brandon hears his sister sing in the restaurant was shot in real time. James Badge Dale and Michael Fassbender had never heard Carey Mulligan sing before so their reactions were real. The scene was shot at 3 in the morning with cameras focused on all 3 performers at the same time. X.

bbook
bbook:

Sissy Sullivan: I’m trying, I’m trying to help you.  Brandon Sullivan: How are you helping me, huh? How are you helping me? How are you helping me? Huh? Look at me. You come in here and you’re a weight on me. Do you understand me? You’re a burden. You’re just dragging me down. How are you helping me? You can’t even clean up after yourself. Stop playing the victim.  Sissy Sullivan: I’m not playing the victim. If I left, I would never hear from you again. Don’t you think that’s sad? Don’t you think that’s sad? You’re my brother.

bbook:

Sissy Sullivan: I’m trying, I’m trying to help you.
Brandon Sullivan: How are you helping me, huh? How are you helping me? How are you helping me? Huh? Look at me. You come in here and you’re a weight on me. Do you understand me? You’re a burden. You’re just dragging me down. How are you helping me? You can’t even clean up after yourself. Stop playing the victim.
Sissy Sullivan: I’m not playing the victim. If I left, I would never hear from you again. Don’t you think that’s sad? Don’t you think that’s sad? You’re my brother.